Expertise Committees

Technical Expertise Committee

Legal Expertise Committee

Charles Ess

Charles Ess

Professor, University of Oslo

Professor of Media Studies in the Department of Media and Communication at the University of Oslo, Norway. He works at the intersections of philosophy, computing, applied ethics, comparative philosophy, and media studies, with specific focus on research ethics, Digital Religion, and virtue ethics in media and communication, specifically social robots.

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Virginia Dignum

Virginia Dignum

Associate Professor, TU Delft

Virginia Dignum is Associate Professor on Social Artificial Intelligence at the Faculty of Technology Policy and Management at TU Delft, and Principal Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. She is internationally recognised for her research in Multi-Agent Organisations and Normative Systems, for which she was awarded the prestigious Veni grant from NWO (Dutch Organization for Scientific Research) in 2006. Her research focuses on value-sensitive design of intelligent systems and multi-agent organisations, in particular on the formalisation of ethical and normative behaviours and of social interactions. She is currently Secretary of the International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multi- agent Systems (IFAAMAS), member of the Executive Committee of the IEEE Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous Systems, and co-chair of ECAI2016, the European Conference on Artificial Intelligence.

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Mark Coekelbergh

Mark Coekelbergh

Professor, Vienna

Mark Coeckelbergh (Ph.D., University of Birmingham) is a philosopher of technology. He is Professor of Philosophy of Media and Technology (research group pageat the Department of Philosophy of the University of Vienna. (staff page) and Vice-President of the Society for Philosophy and Technology. He also has an affiliation as Professor of Technology and Social Responsibility at the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility, De Montfort University, UK (staff page). He is head of the research group Philosophy of Media and Technology

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Kevin Kelly

Kevin Kelly

Founding Editor, Wired Magazine

Kevin Kelly is the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Review. He has also been a writer, photographer, conservationist, and student of Asian and digital culture.

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Kay Firth-Butterfield

Kay Firth-Butterfield

Barrister-at-Law

Kay Firth-Butterfield is a Barrister, and Executive Director of AI-Austin Executive Director and Founding Advocate of AI-Austin which is a non-profit dedicated to the development of law and ethics around the creation and use of AI and the socially beneficial use of AI. She is Vice-Chair of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in AI and Autonomous Systems and contributed to the Future of Life Institute’s 23 Principles for Ethical AI. In 2015, she co-founded the Consortium on Law and Ethics of AI and Robotics at the University of Texas where she is a Senior Fellow in the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law. Kay has advanced degrees in Law and International Relations and advises governments, think tanks, businesses, IGOs and non-profits about AI, law and policy. Twitter: @KayFButterfield

Kristen Thomasen

Kristen Thomasen

Assistant Professor, University of Windsor

Kristen Thomasen is an Assistant Professor of Law, Robotics & Society at the University of Windsor Faculty of Law, and she is a PhD Candidate in Law at the University of Ottawa. Her doctoral research examines the impact of drones and privacy in public, and received a SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Kristen previously clerked for the Honourable Madam Justice Rosalie Abella at the Supreme Court of Canada and is a member of the Law Society of Alberta.

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@KristenThomasen

Christopher Markou

Christopher Markou

PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge

Christopher Markou is a PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge. His thesis, entitled ‘Legal Autonomy and Technological Change: A Systems Theoretical Analysis of Artificial Intelligence’ is supervised by Professor Simon Deakin (Law) and Professor Ross Anderson (Computer Science) and generously funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

Christopher holds degrees from The University’s of Toronto and Manchester and writes extensively on issues of law and technological change for both academic and popular audiences. His writing has featured in The Guardian, Huffington Post, The Conversation, Creative Review, Wired and other outlets.

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@cpmarkou